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Guacamole

mexican-food-guacamole

What is Guacamole?

Guacamole is an avocado-based sauce that originated with the Aztecs in Mexico around the 16th century. The name comes from an Aztec dialect via Nahuatl. It has become a very popular appetizer in the Mexican cuisine as well as the American cuisine as a dip, condiment and salad ingredient. It is traditionally made by mashing ripe avocados with a molcajete (mortar and pestle) with sea salt. Some recipes call for tomato, onion, garlic, lemon juice, chili and/or additional seasonings.

Ingredients for 1 batch

  • 3 Haas avocados, halved, seeded and peeled
  • 1 lime, juiced
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne
  • 1/2 medium onion, diced
  • 1/2 jalapeno pepper, seeded and minced
  • 2 Roma tomatoes, seeded and diced
  • 1 tablespoon chopped cilantro
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • Bag of tortilla chips

Directions

In a large bowl place the scooped avocado pulp and lime juice, toss to coat. Drain, and reserve the lime juice, after all of the avocados have been coated. Using a potato masher add the salt, cumin, and cayenne and mash. Then, fold in the onions, jalapeno, tomatoes, cilantro, and garlic. Add 1 tablespoon of the reserved lime juice. Let sit at room temperature for 1 hour and then serve. Serve with tortilla chips.

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Chicken Enchiladas

mexican-cheese-enchiladas-chicken

What is Chicken Enchiladas?

Enchiladas originated in Mexico, where the practice of rolling tortillas around other food dates back at least to Mayan times. The people living in the lake region of the Valley of Mexico traditionally ate corn tortillas folded or rolled around small fish. Writing at the time of the Spanish conquistadors, Bernal Díaz del Castillo documented a feast enjoyed by Europeans hosted by Hernán Cortés in Coyoacán, which included foods served in corn tortillas. Traditionally, enchiladas consist of a tortilla stuffed with meat and other food items, which is rolled up, covered with a spicy sauce, and baked. However, this dish can be filled and covered with a seemingly endless variety of ingredients.

Ingredients for 8 servings

  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 1/2 pounds skinless boneless chicken breast
  • Salt and pepper
  • 2 teaspoons cumin powder
  • 2 teaspoons garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon Mexican Spice Blend
  • 1 red onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 cup frozen corn, thawed
  • 5 canned whole green chiles, seeded and coarsely chopped
  • 4 canned chipotle chiles, seeded and minced
  • 1 (28-ounce) can stewed tomatoes
  • 1/2 teaspoon all-purpose flour
  • 16 corn tortillas
  • 1 1/2 cups enchilada sauce, canned
  • 1 cup shredded Cheddar and Jack cheeses
  • Garnish: chopped cilantro leaves, chopped scallions, sour cream, chopped tomatoes

Directions

Coat large saute pan with oil. Season chicken with salt and pepper. Brown chicken over medium heat, allow 7 minutes each side or until no longer pink. Sprinkle chicken with cumin, garlic powder and Mexican spices before turning. Remove chicken to a platter, allow to cool.

Saute onion and garlic in chicken drippings until tender. Add corn and chiles. Stir well to combine. Add canned tomatoes, saute 1 minute.

Pull chicken breasts apart by hand into shredded strips. Add shredded chicken to saute pan, combine with vegetables. Dust the mixture with flour to help set.

Microwave tortillas on high for 30 seconds. This softens them and makes them more pliable. Coat the bottom of 2 (13 by 9-inch) pans with a ladle of enchilada sauce. Using a large shallow bowl, dip each tortilla in enchilada sauce to lightly coat. Spoon 1/4 cup chicken mixture in each tortilla. Fold over filling, place 8 enchiladas in each pan with seam side down. Top with remaining enchilada sauce and cheese.

Bake for 15 minutes in a preheated 350 degree F oven until cheese melts.

Optional: Garnish with cilantro, scallion, sour cream and chopped tomatoes before serving. Serve with Spanish rice and beans.

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Chile Relleno Recipe

chile-relleno-mexican-food

What is a Chile Relleno? 

Chile Relleno is a dish of Mexican cuisine that originated in the city of Puebla.  It consists of a stuffed, roasted, fresh poblano pepper, sometimes substituted with non-traditional Hatch chile, Anaheim, pasilla or even jalapeño chili peppper. In its earliest incarnations, it was described as a “green chile pepper stuffed with minced meat and coated with eggs.  In current cuisine, it is typically stuffed with melted cheese, such asqueso Chihuahua or queso Oaxaca or picadillo meat made of diced pork, raisins and nuts, seasoned with canella; covered in an eggbatter or simply corn masa flour and fried. Although it is often served in a tomato sauce, the sauces can vary.

Ingredients for 6 servings

  • 6 poblano chile peppers
  • 5 plum tomatoes, cored and coarsely chopped
  • 1/2 small white onion, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1 1/2 cups shredded monterey jack cheese
  • 1 tablespoon dried oregano, preferably Mexican
  • 3 large egg whites plus 1 egg yolk, at room temperature
  • Vegetable oil, for frying
  • All-purpose flour, for dredging

Directions 

  1. Char the chiles.
  2. Turn a gas burner on high. Char the chiles on the burner grate, turning with tongs, until blackened all over. You can also char the chiles under the broiler.
  3. Let them soften.
  4. Transfer the charred chiles to a heavy-duty resealable plastic bag and close. Let stand 10 minutes. The chiles will steam in the bag, making them soft and easy to peel.
  5. Remove the skin.
  6. Gently rub the chiles with paper towels to remove as much skin as possible. If a few flecks remain-they’ll add flavor, don’t rinse them off.
  7. Open the chiles.
  8. Using a paring knife, make a slit across the top of a chile just below the stem, leaving the stem intact. Starting from the middle of the slit, slice lengthwise down to the tip of the pepper (cut through only one layer). Open the chile like a book and pull out the seeds and inner membranes. You may need to use a paring knife to loosen the top of the seedpod. Repeat with the remaining chiles.
  9. Prepare the sauce.
  10. Puree the tomatoes, onion and garlic in a blender until smooth. Warm the olive oil in a saucepan over medium heat. Add the tomato puree and simmer 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Season with salt and pepper and keep warm.
  11. Make the filling.
  12. Place the cheese in a bowl, then add the oregano, crumbling and rubbing it with your fingers to release its flavor. Season the mixture with salt and pepper.
  13. Stuff the chiles.
  14. Fill each chile with about 1/4 cup cheese mixture. Fold in the sides to cover the filling, then thread 2 toothpicks across the seam to form an X. You will probably need to make a second toothpick X to secure each chile so the filling doesn’t leak out when you fry.
  15. Mix the batter.
  16. Beat the egg whites with a mixer on high speed until soft peaks form. Add the egg yolk and beat 3 more minutes.
  17. Batter and fry.
  18. Heat about 1 inch vegetable oil in a deep skillet over medium-high heat until a deep-fry thermometer registers 375 degrees F.
  19. Dredge: Pour flour into a shallow dish and season with salt and pepper. One at a time, coat the stuffed chiles with the flour.
  20. Batter: Holding each chile by the stem, lower it into the egg batter to cover completely. Let any excess batter drip off.
  21. Fry: Add the chiles to the hot oil, 1 or 2 at a time; fry, flipping once with tongs, until golden, 1 to 2 minutes per side. Drain on paper towels.
  22. Place a fried chile on each plate and pour the warm sauce over it. Serve immediately.
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Flan Recipe

mexican-flan-desserts

What is flan?

Flan is an oven-baked caramel custard desert that is very popular in Puerto Rico, Spain and Mexico among many other Latin countries. It is made with a top layer of custard paired with the sweetness of a light caramel sauce, which is put in the bottom of the pan underneath it. Both are baked together. When chilled and then inverted to un-mold, the sauce pours over the custard and is served as is. The typical flavoring is simply vanilla, but there are numerous variations. Flan may be prepared in a soufflè dish or in individual ramekins or flan dishes.

Ingredients for 6-8 servings

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Caramel

  • ½ cup sugar
  • 2 tablespoons water

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Flan

  • 6 egg yolks
  • 1 large whole egg
  • 1 tablespoon aged rum (optional)
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • ½ cup sugar
  • ½ cup (4 ounces) heavy cream
  • ½ cup (4 ounces) whole milk
  • 1½ cups (12 ounces) evaporated milk
  • 8” round metal or glass baking pan

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Directions

  1. Preheat oven at 350° F
  2. For caramel: Place sugar and water in a heavy pan. Mix and cook at medium heat until sugar is dissolved and acquires a light amber color. Cover the bottom of the custard pan with caramel and set aside.
  3. Mix the first seven ingredients (six if you exclude the rum) in a blender. Add the heavy cream, whole milk and evaporated milk and continue mixing until an even consistency is reached.
  4. Strain this mixture through a sieve and pour into the caramel-coated pan.
  5. Place pan in a larger metal tray with ½” of water and bake, uncovered, for 35-40 minutes. The flan will be ready when an inserted toothpick or knife comes out clean.
  6. Bring to room temperature before refrigerating. Cool overnight in the refrigerator or for a minimum of 4 hours.
  7. Flip the flan out of the pan and onto a plate for serving.
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Mariachi music becoming popular in nations across the world

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS — Among Mexican-Americans in the United States, mariachi music has maintained its popularity for more than a century, especially in states that border Mexico, like Texas. But there are now mariachi groups in all parts of the United States and in some European and Asian nations as well.

Mariachi music has long been popular with San Antonio’s large Mexican-American population.

But among the young people performing at this event was 12-year-old Anani Rhames, an African-American girl who fell in love with the songs she heard in Mexican restaurants and on local radio stations.

“I like ‘Las Margaritas,’ which is about daisies and I like ‘El Pastor,’ which is about a shepherd,” she said.

Anani can relate to rural themes because she lives on a ranch and sometimes sings to her horses.

“You can actually connect with them. You can build a bond with them,” she said. “When they hear you their ears kind of perk up and they are like [it is as if they were saying] ‘hmmm, interesting.”

Read more: http://www.voanews.com/content/mariachi-music-gains-popularity-across-ethnic-lines/1826410.html

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Mariachi Divas awarded its second Grammy!

divas_win
UC Riverside’s Stephanie Martinez often spends Sundays playing the violin and singing with her group, Mariachi Divas, at Disney California Adventure.
But this past Sunday, Martinez instead walked on stage to accept a Grammy award with her bandmates in Los Angeles.
“We were in shock,” Martinez said Monday. “It’s like, amazing. It’s a steppingstone for women. We feel, if we can accomplish that, what more can we do, and everyone else — all the women out there.”
Mariachi Divas won for Best Regional Mexican Album during Sunday’s pretelecast of the Grammys.
It was the Divas’ second Grammy; the group has been nominated five times.
“I feel like I’m dreaming and I’m going to wake up,” said Cindy Shea, who founded the group 15 years ago.
“It’s amazing. It’s the greatest honor of my life.”

Read more: http://www.pe.com/iguide/music/music-headlines/20140128-grammys-golden-night-for-mariachi-divas.ece

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